Tag Archives: muslim reformation

Islam is in need of reform but who is going to do it?

[The following blog post was written to determine what, if anything, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) is doing to reform Islam in America. Reformation of Islamic ideology in America is necessary if we are going live in peace free from Islamic terrorists and Muslims must take some, if not all, of the responsibility to make that happen. It is, after all, their ideology and practices that are at the root of the problem. Simply put, Muslims have to recognize and take ownership of the problem.

This post was sent twice to the CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad on the CAIR contact us web page. No response has been received.]

Islam-backgroundDear Mr. Awad,

CAIR seems to be the only Islamic organization in the U.S. that appears to be anything close to a unifying voice for the autonomous Muslim clerics across the country. Further, CAIR seems to be very influential with the White House having succeeded in convincing the administration to replace words like “jihad” and phrases like “Islamist terrorism” or “radical Islam” with terminology they consider more politically correct. I’m therefore appealing to CAIR to answer a few questions which I believe are of extreme concern to non-Muslim Americans regarding CAIR’s position on a few issues and what CAIR is doing to address these issues.

According to Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s book Heretic: Why Islam Needs a Reformation Now, Islam can be divided into two camps: Mecca Muslims and Medina Muslims, The Mecca Muslims follow Mohammad’s peaceful period while the Medina Muslims follow the Quranic verses from his war-like period. CAIR seems to follow the Mecca Muslim teachings. But if, as you say repeatedly on the CAIR website, the “Quran is Islam’s revealed text,” without getting into issues in comparative religion, what are we to make of verses like 9:5 and 9:29, for example, which seem to be foundational to Islamic terrorists and are in opposition to the verse ‘Let there be no compulsion in religion’ (2:256)? Continue reading

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